Greater New Haven Clean Cities Coalition

Building Partnerships to Reduce greenhouse gas emissions Emissions and Cut Petroleum Use in Transportation

Our Mission

Initial Survey for State and Local Government Engagement

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Talk to fleets using alterntaive fuels and new technologies

Events

About

The Greater New Haven Clean Cities Coalition, Inc. (GNHCCC) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that furthers the use of alternative fuels and advanced technology vehicles. We were first designated a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Cities Coalition in October 1995. The GNHCCC covers New Haven County and other areas of Connecticut as it handles federal grant projects.

The GNHCCC brings together stakeholders in the public and private sectors to deploy alternative and renewable fuels, idle-reduction measures, fuel economy improvements, and emerging transportation technologies. The goal is to improve air quality, support economic development, increase energy security, and reduce dependence on petroleum. We do this by providing education and training, technical expertise, networking opportunities, and funding assistance to our stakeholders.

Over 20 Years of Advancement

GNHCCC was designated in October of 1995 as a coalition of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Clean Cities Program.

Our Mission

Nationally, there are nearly 100 Clean Cities coalitions that advance the nation’s economic, environmental, and energy security by supporting local actions to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and cut petroleum use in transportation.

To learn more visit the Clean Cities website.

Why Clean Cities?

The United States relies heavily on foreign oil to power its transportation sector. Our country imported about 40% of the petroleum it consumed in 2012, and about two-thirds of these imports came from outside North America, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Support U.S. Economy and Energy Security

Transportation accounts for about 71% of U.S. petroleum consumption

Reduce emissions impacting air quality and public health

Gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles are major sources of greenhouse gases, smog-forming compounds, particulate matter, and other air pollutants

GNHCCC Coordinators

lee-grannis-headshot-2Lee Grannis

Lee started the New Haven Clean Cities coalition in 1995 and has served as the coalition’s coordinator for the last 17 years.

Lee's Bio
As part of his Clean Cities mission, Grannis has developed projects and obtained federal and matching funding for compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, light duty electric vehicles, electric transit, hydrogen hybrid, and biodiesel projects, and related outreach project funding. He has provided alternative vehicle and fuel consultation and assistance to many organizations in Connecticut and outside the state, including several towns and cities, metropolitan transit authorities, utilities, community colleges, universities, laboratories, and airports. He serves as an on-call advisor to Connecticut state government staff and Connecticut’s U.S. Congressional and Senatorial staff. Recently, his coalition, in partnership with the three other Connecticut Clean Cities coalitions and 27 other partners, was awarded $29 million (including partner match) from the U.S. Department of Energy for alternative fuel infrastructure and vehicle deployment in Connecticut. Grannis was selected as the Northeast Region Clean Cities Coordinator of the Year in 2004 and 2008 and was inducted into the national Clean Cities Hall of Fame in 2012. Grannis retired after 23 years as a lieutenant colonel infantry from the U.S. Army. He held several combat and logistical positions, which included two combat tours in Vietnam. He attended several military schools and is a graduate of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. Grannis has a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Eastern Kentucky University in Political Science and a Master of Arts in Public Administration from Central Michigan University.

paul-wessel-headshotPaul Wessel

Paul worked his way up from Clean Cities stakeholder to board member to co-coordinator.

Paul's Bio
Wessel leads the Green Parking Council, a national 501(c)(3) organization fostering green parking practices through certification and credentialing programs, open-sourced standards, professional leadership and educational development. He was previously Deputy Economic Development Administrator and Director of Traffic & Parking for the City of New Haven, CT and served on the boards of the New Haven Parking Authority, the Greater New Haven Transit District and Greater New Haven Clean Cities. Under his leadership, New Haven introduced electric vehicle shuttle buses, upgraded parking enforcement and meter technology and increased parking revenue dramatically. He has experience in legislative and community advocacy, municipal economic development, engaging foundations and non-profits in community development and developing public-private partnerships. Wessel has a M.S. in Urban Policy Analysis and Management from New School University and a B.A. in History from Wesleyan University.

GNHCCC Stakeholders

Almost 18,000 stakeholders contribute to Clean Cities’ goals and accomplishments through participation in nearly 100 Clean Cities coalitions across the country. Private companies, fuel suppliers, local governments, vehicle manufacturers, national laboratories, state and federal government agencies, and other organizations join together under Clean Cities to implement alternative-transportation solutions in their communities.

Technology

We work with fleets of all vehicle sizes, vehicle numbers, and vocations to find ways to reduce petroleum consumption through the use of alternative and renewable fuels, advanced vehicles, and other fuel-saving measures.

Alternative and Renewable Fuels

Many different fuel options exist which can help displace petroleum consumption and reduce emissions. These fuels are defined in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) including biodiesel, electricity, ethanol, hydrogen, natural gas, propane. Alternative fuels may include both renewable and non-renewable fuels, and interest in their use is expanding among the general public as well as large fleets. Although availability of different fuels has sometimes been a challenge in the past, refueling infrastructure is expanding throughout the country and specifically Connecticut to meet the growing demand.

icon_biodiesel_greenBiodiesel is a domestically produced, renewable fuel that can be manufactured from vegetable oils, animal fats, or recycled restaurant grease for use in diesel vehicles. Biodiesel’s physical properties are similar to those of petroleum diesel, but it is a cleaner-burning alternative. Using biodiesel in place of petroleum diesel, especially in older vehicles, can reduce emissions. To find out more about biodiesel, visit the US Department of Energy’s biodiesel website or you can download a PDF fact sheet to print out.

icon_electricity_greenElectricity can be used to power all-electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. These vehicles can draw electricity directly from the grid and other off-board electrical power sources and store it in batteries. Hybrid electric vehicles use electricity to boost fuel efficiency. Using electricity to power vehicles can have significant energy security and emissions benefits. To find out more about powering cars with electricity, visit the US Department of Energy’s electricity website or you can download a PDF fact sheet to print out.

icon_ethanol_greenEthanol is a renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. The use of ethanol is widespread—almost all gasoline in the U.S. contains some ethanol. Ethanol is available as E85—a high-level ethanol blend containing 51%-83% ethanol depending on season and geography—for use in flexible fuel vehicles. E15 is defined by the Environmental Protection Agency as a blend of 10%-15% ethanol with gasoline. It is an approved ethanol blend for model year vehicles 2001 and newer. To find out more about ethanol, visit the US Department of Energy’s ethanol website or you can download a PDF fact sheet to print out.
icon_hydrogen_greenHydrogen, when used in a fuel cell, is an emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from diverse domestic energy sources. Research and commercial efforts are under way to build the hydrogen fueling infrastructure and produce hydrogen fuel cell vehicles that are practical for widespread use. To find out more about hydrogen, visit the US Department of Energy’s hydrogen website.

icon_natgas_greenNatural gas is a domestically produced gaseous fuel, readily available through the utility infrastructure. This clean-burning alternative fuel can be used in vehicles as either compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), renewable natural gas (RNG), or biogas. To find out more about natural gas, visit the US Department of Energy’s natural gas website or you can download a PDF fact sheet to print out.

icon_lpg_greenPropane, also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) or propane autogas, has been used worldwide as a vehicle fuel for decades. It is stored as a liquid, and propane fueling infrastructure is widespread.

To find out more about propane autogas, visit the US Department of Energy’s propane website or you can download a PDF fact sheet to print out.

Alternative Fuel Prices

Compare the latest quarterly national average price report.

Vehicle Search

Find and compare alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs), engines, and hybrid systems for light-, medium-, and heavy-duty vehicles.

Fuel Station Locator

Find a fueling station near you.

Gallons of petroleum saved in 2015

Alternative Fuel Vehicles

As vehicle technology continues to advance, the variety of vehicle types available is increasing rapidly. Consumers and fleets can now choose to purchase vehicles that use an alternative fuel, an advanced hybrid powertrain, all-electric vehicles, energy-efficient diesel, or simply a highly efficient conventional gasoline engine. More choices, such as fuel-cell vehicles are on the horizon. The Department of Energy provides a list of energy-efficient technologies that are offered on many vehicles available today. AFVs are available either as conversions or as original manufacturer equipment, and come in both light-duty passenger vehicles and heavy-duty vehicles and equipment. Alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs), as defined by the EPAct, include any dedicated, flexible-fuel, bi-fuel, or dual-fuel vehicle designed to operate on at least one alternative fuel. To the right are the definitions of each type.


Dedicated

Designed to run only on the alternative fuel.

Flexible-fuel

Capable of operating on gasoline, E85, or a mixture of the two.

Bi-fuel

Designed with two separate fueling systems that allows for operation on natural gas or propane and conventional gasoline.

Dual-fuel

Requires both alternative fuel and diesel fuel storage and delivery systems. Mainly developed for heavy-duty applications-usually out of warranty.

Success Stories & Case Studies

Find case studies and other information about fleets that have successfully adopted alternative fuels and advanced vehicles

Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Search

Find and compare alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs), engines, and hybrid systems

Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel & Advanced Medium- & Heavy-Duty Vehicles

Overview the individual medium- and heavy-duty vehicles, listed by application

2016 Clean Vehicle Buyer's Guide

Read through comprehensive list of the 2016 light-duty models that use alternative fuels or advanced fuel-saving technologies

Fuel-Saving Measures

More than 250 million vehicles consume millions of barrels of petroleum every day in the United States. On-road passenger travel alone accounts for more than 2.5 trillion vehicle miles traveled each year. You can use strategies and techniques to conserve fuel which will save money.

box_fuel_econ_greenSave money, reduce climate change, reduce oil dependence costs and increase energy sustainability
box_idle_red_greenFind out how to reduce fuel costs, engine wear, emissions, and noise. Connecticut anti-idling regulations prohibit vehicles of all kinds from unnecessary idling for more than 3 minutes. You can find out about more Connecticut anti-idling efforts.

Projects

GNHCCC and its stakeholders have received several grants throughout the past few years! Click on the tabs below to find out what projects are being funded thanks to these awards.

TrolleyLineThe City of New Haven in conjunction with the GNHCCC deployed an electric trolley system in downtown New Haven during the early 2000’s. E-Bus of Downey, California built four 22 foot dedicated electric trolley replicas that had the capability of both standard battery charging and fast charging. The batteries were charged with “Green Electric Power” derived from waterpower, wind and solar. The project provided a clean alternative fuel for public transportation. Everywhere the electric trolleys were put into service, mass transportation ridership increased dramatically because people appreciated the electric power train’s smooth, quiet, non-polluting ride. By going with the electric trolley technology, a reduction in dangerous soot particles associated with standard diesel powered buses was realized, as well as reducing the number of fuel trucks carrying foreign fuel to the vehicle refueling locations.
BioWatz_Logo_FinalFunded in FY2008, the BioWatz Project allowed the GNHCCC to work with Chris Glynos at BioPur, Inc., located in Bethlehem, CT, to build on the biodiesel production facility operated by Glynos. The project engaged an integrated team to design, develop and deploy a Power Generation System at the BioPur facility which would enable the production of electricity with biodiesel. The project proved to be very successful, allowing Glynos to sell his renewable power to the local power company — after he uses some of it to provide power for the biodiesel production facility. The project collected data through a system designed and installed by Sabre Engineering of Colorado and Innovation Drive, the project management firm provided support to the growth of this operation. The federal project officially ended in late 2010.
CTCCFFThe Greater New Haven Clean Cities Coalition, Inc. (GNHCCC), together with over 30 partner organizations will develop and implement a state-wide, fuel-neutral effort that will deploy 269 alternative fuel vehicles (AFV) through incremental funding and provide fueling capability for 21 additional fleet vehicles and infrastructure necessary to directly support the vehicle deployments as part of the Connecticut Clean Cities Future Fuels Project. The project will increase the utilization of alternative fuels; strengthen the availability of alternative fuels for fleets and commercial consumers along major corridors in the state; raise awareness and foster greater understanding of alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies through a targeted outreach and education effort; create and retain jobs; reduce dependence on foreign oil; reduce harmful emissions; and contribute to a sustainable alternative fuels market.

Fleets using alternative fuels

Tons of greenhouse gas emissions avoided in 2015

Get Involved

Click on the tabs below for more information on how you and your organization can get involved.

Becoming a member of the Greater New Haven Clean Cities Coalition (GNHCCC) provides stakeholders access to a variety of benefits that promote their success. Industry-wide networking, access to expert technical advice, statistical data and funding opportunities through state and federal sources represent just a few key benefits of membership. Simply stated, being a stakeholder in a Clean Cities Coalition means being a member of the largest group of committed individuals and organizations in a nation supporting energy independence, petroleum reduction and environmental consciousness. If you are interested in becoming a stakeholder with the Greater New Haven Clean Cities Coalition, please fill out the contact form (in the footer) or contact Lee Grannis via phone at 203.627.3715 or email grannis@nhcleancities.org.
Contribute to Greater New Haven Clean Cities Coalition to continue our efforts to achieve a more energy independent and cleaner air future. Your tax-deductible contribution ensures our ability to decrease petroleum consumption. We thank you for your continued support. To donate, please email Lee Grannis at grannis@nhcleancities.org.
NAFANAFA’s Sustainable Fleet Accreditation Program is the distinctive accreditation program that provides the tools that help automotive fleets measure and track improvements in their environmental impact. Watch NAFA’s Sustainable Fleet Accreditation Program video

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Relationship to Coalition

Upcoming Events

News

Click on the posts below to read more about that news story. You can also read all of the news stories here.

Deadline Extended for 2016 Clean Diesel Funding

Attention Connecticut Clean Diesel Stakeholders! The deadline for receiving proposals for this year’s Connecticut State DERA Program has been extended to September 20, 2016. Proposals submitted by the September 7, 2016 original deadline will receive a bonus criteria... read more

Join the rEVolution! September 10-18

We want to make sure you know about National Drive Electric Week taking place September 10-18 in more than 200 locations across the country. The purpose is to raise awareness and draw attention to the widespread availability of electric- and plug-in vehicles.... read more

Contact Us

Feel free to contact GNHCCC Co-coordinator, Lee Grannis

Phone 203-627-3715

You can also fill out the form below and we will get back to you as soon as we can.
Click here to fill out the form

61 Rolling Green Road, Bethany, CT 06524


Connecticut Clean Cities

Greater New Haven Clean Cities is one of four coalitions in the state of Connecticut. Together, the four coalitions cover the entire state. For more information about the other Connecticut coalitions, please contact the appropriate coalition coordinator.

Capital Clean Cities of Connecticut

Craig Peters

800.255.2631

P.O. Box 1253 South Windsor, CT 06074

Conncticut Southwestern Area Clean Cities

Ed Boman

203.256.3010

725 Old Post Road Fairfield, CT 06430

Norwich Area Clean Cities

Jeanne Kurasz

860.823.4182

16 South Golden Street Norwich, CT 06360

A U.S. Dept. of Energy Designated Clean Cities Coalition